Game Story Case Studies, Episode 29: Puyo Puyo Tetris (Part 29)

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Today we have another scene to analyze from Puyo Puyo Tetris. This one is relatively short, and is near the end of the game. There should be two more episodes left in this game story’s case study, with the last one to feature the last two scenes in one article. There are, of course, a lot of spoilers in this series, so you can use the above links to browse my other articles if you aren’t ready to read them. Now, let’s get started!

Act 7, Scene 5:

Recap: Ringo, Tee and friends have been chasing Ex, the Keeper of Dimensions at the edge of spacetime. They reach the very edge, and are about to find out what he wants…

act7Sce5Pt1act7Sce5Pt2act7Sce5Pt3act7Sce5Pt4act7Sce5Pt5

So Ex brought the crew here. Let’s see if we can find out why…Much of this is currently unclear, and I’m unsure if that is effective writing at this time. Let’s move on.

act7Sce5Pt6act7Sce5Pt7act7Sce5Pt8act7Sce5Pt9act7Sce5Pt10act7Sce5Pt11act7Sce5Pt12act7Sce5Pt13

So this is a little odd, even in the context of this game’s story. I find it odd that Tetris or Puyo Puyo “battles” seem to fix everything. Ex seemed to have lost his purpose, so battling the Tetris King (Tee, in case you forgot) will remind him of that. I’m not sure if I understand. Maybe Ex needs a thrilling challenge to remember that something is at stake? Nobody seems to get hurt in Tetris battles, so I’m not sure how that works. In fact, I’m not sure how this story’s world works either, and I think if they were to explain abstract puzzle games, then some more clarity would help. Oh well, there’s not much more left to this scene, so let’s wrap this up.

act7Sce5Pt14act7Sce5Pt15act7Sce5Pt16act7Sce5Pt17act7Sce5Pt18

And these last few lines are incredibly basic. Essentially they are slightly more elaborate variations of “I challenge you!” and “I accept!” If it were that simple, these lines wouldn’t work at all, but what they went with here was almost too basic.

Incidentally, the game shifts to gameplay here, and the aftermath of the player winning starts in the next scene. This seems like a scene that is the right length for a video game, but a little short for most other media. Also, this scene is much shorter than most other scenes in this game. I wish more of them were closer to this length, as most players want to play, not watch the games they own. Sure, some context can help, but this story has frequently tried too hard to explain something as odd as a puzzle video game, and fails despite that effort.

There are two more episodes left for this game’s case study, with the last one having two scenes in one. Stay tuned, as I will rate the game’s story in the final episode!


And that wraps up this episode’s scene from Puyo Puyo Tetris. What did you make of this scene? What might you do differently if you wrote it? Any good or bad points that I missed? Let me know in the comments below! If you enjoyed this analysis, then click that like button and share on social media! You can keep up with That’s All Games by subscribing via email or WordPress. Until next time, have fun gaming!

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